The Implicit Social Code of Speech Prosody | Part 1

Speech Prosody

Research credits: Emmanuel Ponsot, Juan Jose’ Burred, Pascal Belin, Jean-Julien Aucouturier | Duke University. Michel Belyk and Steve Brown | Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behavior, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada The term “prosody” comes from the Greek word prosodia, meaning “sung to music.” Speech prosody, therefore, refers to the song-like modulations that accompany speech.There are two types of speech prosody: affective prosody, which refers to pitch modulations that reflect the speaker’s psychological / emotional state (Fairbanks and Pronovost 1938)

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Pragmatic Analysis: The Last Frontier of NLP

Pragmatic Intelligence

Trinity: No one has ever done anything like this.. .Neo: That’s why it is going to work. The Matrix Fact I: Babies learn to communicate before learning to speak. Fact II: if you google the term “Pragmatics” (the meanings and intentions at the base of our communication) you’ll find it to be categorized as a “sub-field” of linguistics. This, imho, is the source of all evil in NLP today. Teaser: for those who proclaim to provide “insights” or “tips” on communication between

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Speech Acts, Intentions and Conversational Implicature

Paul Grice

Credits: Speech Acts Theory was Developed by John Austin (1962) & elaborated by John Searle (1969) | Conversational Implicature was developed by Paul Grice (1989), Professor Thomas M. Holtgraves, Ball State University This post will delve into two of the most prominent socio-linguistic theories: Speech Acts. Developed by John Austin (published posthumously in 1961/’62) and expanded upon by John Searle (1981), this theory explicitly conceptualizes linguistic meaning as “use.” Put simply, the intended meaning of an utterance is the “use”

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